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person - F9 Group Marketing and Technology Blog

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Entries Tagged ‘person’

Creating PDF Documents with ASP.NET and iTextSharp

The Portable Document Format (PDF) is a popular file format for documents. Due to their ubiquity and layout capabilities, it’s not uncommon for a websites to use PDF technology. For example, an eCommerce store may offer a “printable receipt” option that, when selected, displays a PDF file within the browser. Last week’s article, Filling in PDF Forms with ASP.NET and iTextSharp , looked at how to work with a special kind of PDF document, namely one that has one or more fields defined. A PDF document can contain various types of user interface elements, which are referred to as fields. For instance, there is a text field, a checkbox field, a combobox field, and more. Typically, the person viewing the PDF on her computer interacts with the document’s fields; however, it is possible to enumerate and fill a PDF’s fields programmatically, as we saw in last week’s article.

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Advice for Storing and Displaying Dates and Times Across Different Time Zones

A common question I receive from clients, colleagues, and 4Guys readers is for recommendations on how best to store and display dates and times in a data-driven web application. One of the challenges in storing and displaying dates in a web application is that it is quite likely that the visitors arriving at your site are not in the same time zone as your web server; moreover, it’s very likely that your site attracts visitors from many different time zones from around the world. Consider an online messageboard site, like ASPMessageboard.com , where each of 1,000,000+ posts includes the date and time it was made. Imagine a user from New York leaves a post on April 7th at 4:30 PM and that the web server hosting the site is located in Dallas, Texas, which is one hour earlier than New York. When storing that post to the database do you record the post’s date and time relative to the visitor (4:30 PM), the relative to the web server (3:30 PM), or some other value? And when displaying this post how do you show that date and time to a reader in San Francisco, which is three hours earlier than New York? Do you show the time relative to the person who made the post (4:30 PM), relative to the web server (3:30 PM), or relative to the user (1:30 PM)? And if you decide to store or display the date based on the poster’s or visitor’s time zone then how do you know their time zone and its offset? How do you account for daylight savings, and so on? This article provides guidance on how to store and display dates and times for visitors across different time zones and includes a demo that gives a working example of some of these techniques. Read on to learn more! Read More >

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Examining ASP.NET 2.0’s Membership, Roles, and Profile – Part 13

ASP.NET’s forms-based authentication system in tandem with the Membership API and Login Web controls make it a cinch to create a user store, create user accounts, and allow visitors to log into the site. What’s more, with little effort it’s possible to define roles, associate user accounts with roles, and determine what functionality is available based on the currently logged in user’s role (see Part 2 ). Many ASP.NET sites that use Membership have an Admin role, and users in that role are granted certain functionality not available to non-Admin users. Consider an online store – Admin users might be able to manage inventory, whereas the only way normal members could interact with the inventory was by adding items to their shopping cart. I was recently working with a client who had an interesting request: he needed the ability for Admin users to be able to log into the site as another user, and perform actions as if that other person had logged in herself. Returning to the online store example, imagine that some customers periodically phone in their order, or mail or fax in an order form

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