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Entries Tagged ‘control’

Using Microsoft’s Chart Controls In An ASP.NET Application: Serializing Chart Data

In most usage scenarios, the data displayed in a Microsoft Chart control comes from some dynamic source, such as from a database query. The appearance of the chart can be modified dynamically, as well; past installments in this article series showed how to programmatically customize the axes, labels, and other appearance-related settings. However, it is possible to statically define the chart’s data and appearance strictly through the control’s declarative markup. One of the demos examined in the Getting Started article rendered a column chart with seven columns whose labels and values were defined statically in the <asp:Series> tag’s <Points> collection. Given this functionality, it should come as no surprise that the Microsoft Chart Controls also support serialization . Serialization is the process of persisting the state of a control or an object to some other medium, such as to disk. Deserialization is the inverse process, and involves taking the persisted data and recreating the control or object. With just a few lines of code you can persist the appearance settings, the data, or both to a file on disk or to any stream. Likewise, it takes just a few lines of codes to reconstitute a chart from the persisted information.

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Creating a “What I’m Reading” Widget

A number of personal websites and blogs have a “What I’m Reading” section, where the site owner lists books he’s currently reading. Typically these widgets include a cover image of the book, the title and author, and a link the web visitor can click to buy the book or learn more about it. I recently needed to create a similar sort of widget for a website I was working on. This website did not require anything overly fancy, it just needed a simple administrative interface where the website administrator could enter book information and a User Control that he could drop on a web page that would display his current reading queue. The solution I created uses an XML file to store information about the books displayed in the “What I’m Reading” User Control. The User Control uses a ListView and an XmlDataSource to display the books in the XML file in a series of <div> elements.

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C# Focus TextBox on Form Load

When showing a form that contains a TextBox, it’s common courtesy to focus the TextBox so that the user can begin typing immediately. To focus a TextBox when a Windows Form first loads, simply set the TabIndex for the TextBox to zero (or the lowest TabIndex for any Control on the Form). When a Form is displayed,

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RedirectButton – Redirect Users With the Click of a Button

Virtually every ASP.NET developer has, at one point or another, created a page with a Button control that, when clicked, redirects the user to some other page, perhaps sending along a value entered by the user through the querystring. The typical pattern for implementing such behavior is to add a Button to the page and create a Click event handler that executes a Response.Redirect( url ) . If the redirect incorporates some input from the user, then this pattern is expanded to include the addition of a TextBox or some other control to the page and a Response.Redirect( url ) statement that includes this control’s value. While this approach certainly works, it’s not without a couple of flaws. Firstly, this approach involves a needless round-trip to the server: clicking the Button causes the browser to re-request the page and the response from the server is simply, “Please go to url .” Ideally, when the Button was clicked the browser would immediately request the final destination URL rather than have to do a postback to find out the final destination URL. Second, this approach can lead to a confusing user experience in scenarios where there are multiple TextBoxes on the page and multiple Buttons because there may not be the expected correspondence between hitting Enter in a TextBox and having the associated Button control “clicked.” Consider a website with a master page that has a TextBox and Button for searching the site.

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