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Entries Tagged ‘certainly-works’

Use MvcContrib Grid to Display a Grid of Data in ASP.NET MVC

The past six articles in this series have looked at how to display a grid of data in an ASP.NET MVC application and how to implement features like sorting, paging, and filtering. In each of these past six tutorials we were responsible for generating the rendered markup for the grid. Our Views included the <table> tags, the <th> elements for the header row, and a foreach loop that emitted a series of <td> elements for each row to display in the grid. While this approach certainly works, it does lead to a bit of repetition and inflates the size of our Views. The ASP.NET MVC framework includes an HtmlHelper class that adds support for rendering HTML elements in a View. An instance of this class is available through the Html object, and is often used in a View to create action links ( Html.ActionLink ), textboxes ( Html.TextBoxFor ), and other HTML content. Such content could certainly be created by writing the markup by hand in the View; however, the HtmlHelper makes things easier by offering methods that emit common markup patterns. You can even create your own custom HTML Helpers by adding extension methods to the HtmlHelper class

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Accessing Server-Side Data from Client Script (Part 1)

When building a web application, we must decide how and when the browser will communicate with the web server. The ASP.NET WebForms model greatly simplifies web development by providing a straightforward mechanism for exchanging data between the browser and the server. With WebForms, each ASP.NET page’s rendered output includes a <form> element that performs a postback to the same page whenever a Button control within the form is clicked, or whenever the user modifies a control whose AutoPostBack property is set to True. On postback, the server sends the entire contents of the web page back to the browser, which then displays this new content. With WebForms we don’t need to spend much time or effort thinking about how or when the browser will communicate with the server or how that returned information will be processed by the browser. It just works. While this approach certainly works and has its advantages, it’s not without its drawbacks.

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Creating a Filtering User Interface With jQuery In a Web Forms Application: Part 2

Creating a Filtering User Interface With jQuery In a Web Forms Application: Part 1 looked at how to use jQuery in an ASP.NET Web Forms application to build a collapsible filtering user interface. When the page is loaded into the user’s browser the filtering interface is collapsed. Clicking the filtering interface’s title toggles the interface between its collapsed and expanded states. When expanded, a user can interact with the filtering controls – DropDownLists, TextBoxes, CheckBoxes, and so on – to narrow down the results displayed in the report beneath the filtering interface. While the filtering interface created in Part 1 certainly works, the collapsed/expanded state of the interface is not remembered. Consequently, on any postback or anytime a user leaves the page and comes back, the filtering interface returns to its collapsed state, regardless of whether the user had it expanded. The good news is that with a touch of AJAX we can have the collapsed/expanded state of the filtering user interface remembered for the duration of a user’s session. This article explores how to add such functionality. Read on to learn more! If you’ve not yet read Part 1 , please do so before tackling Part 2. Read More >

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Creating a Filtering User Interface With jQuery In a Web Forms Application: Part 2

Creating a Filtering User Interface With jQuery In a Web Forms Application: Part 1 looked at how to use jQuery in an ASP.NET Web Forms application to build a collapsible filtering user interface. When the page is loaded into the user’s browser the filtering interface is collapsed. Clicking the filtering interface’s title toggles the interface between its collapsed and expanded states. When expanded, a user can interact with the filtering controls – DropDownLists, TextBoxes, CheckBoxes, and so on – to narrow down the results displayed in the report beneath the filtering interface. While the filtering interface created in Part 1 certainly works, the collapsed/expanded state of the interface is not remembered. Consequently, on any postback or anytime a user leaves the page and comes back, the filtering interface returns to its collapsed state, regardless of whether the user had it expanded. The good news is that with a touch of AJAX we can have the collapsed/expanded state of the filtering user interface remembered for the duration of a user’s session. This article explores how to add such functionality. Read on to learn more! If you’ve not yet read Part 1 , please do so before tackling Part 2. Read More >

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